Positive Relations with Others + the Six-Factor Model of Psychological Well-Being

Positive Relations with Others the Six-Factor Model of Psychological Well-Being

Up next in the Six-Factor Model of Psychological Well-Being is the concept of positive, sustained relationships with others. When we score well in this factor, we do so because we have meaningful relationships built on a foundation of intimacy, reciprocity, endearment, and empathy. These relationships are two-way streets; we give and receive equally, and feel fulfilled in these relationships. We allow others to see us fully and to care for us, and we extend the same to others.


Poor markers in the positive relations factor arise when we lack meaningful relationships in our lives, when the relationships we do have an imbalance, when we feel distant from others and unable to connect. When we feel as if no one understands us or truly knows us, or that the people we are connected with are not “our people.”


This is Mission Critical to living a life without alcohol. Actually, positive relationships with other human beings are Mission Critical to our time on Earth in general, but within the scope of removing alcohol from our lives, there may be no more important piece than connection.


We simply cannot do this alone.


When we have meaningful relationships in our lives, we have the ability to be vulnerable. Vulnerability is a key component in battling shame—being able to share our shame stories with someone else and still be seen as whole and loved is a critical piece of dismantling shame. Shame is deeply connected with our self worth, the way we view ourselves. When we have low connection with others, we internalize more shame and that negatively impacts our sense of self. It’s a vicious cycle, and this is just one example of the damage that disconnection from others can bring.